Fayen d'Evie

 

Fayen d'Evie: Essays in Vibrational Poetics // ~~ // Typographic Notes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fayen d’Evie & Benjamin Hancock presented the second issue of Essays in Vibrational Poetics series, for the Ian Potter Museum of Art's Language Forum. Via a collaboration with archaeologist Brent Davis, the issue translated a phrase carved in Linear A, the undeciphered ancient script of the Minoans, into a sensorial text of embodied typography. 

 

Last year, during one of the rare interludes between lockdowns, Fayen and I collaborated with photographer Gregory Lorenzutti on a parallel indexing project, Typographic Notes, where we document the abstracted typographic letterforms from each Vibrational Poetics issue. The images were taken in and around Gregory's extraordinary home garden, amongst hives of buzzing honey bees (creatures revered by the Minoans). 

 

The Potter Museum of Art has just published a selection of these Typographic Notes related to the Minoan translation in their 'Language' publication, which can be purchased in print form, or downloaded for free.

 

There's excellent reading in there, including a conversation between Beth Sometimes, Amelia Kngwarraye Turner and Shirley Kngwarraye Turner on Apmere Angkentye-kenhe (a Place for Language) in Mparntwe.

1/5
Images: Gregory Lorenzutti
 

PUBLICATION

Printed publications are $8 each, or $5 with current University of Melbourne student ID, and are available for purchase at Buxton Contemporary at Southbank Campus.

 

For postal orders, email buxton-contemporary@unimelb.edu.au.

 

The publications can be viewed digitally here

 

Fayen d'Evie: Endnote: The Ethical Handling of Empty Space {~} ... , ... ; ...

 

1/6
Images: Video Stills, Sia Duff

In light of social and environmental urgencies, Fayen d’Evie’s Endnote: the ethical handling of empty spaces considers how we might publish ideas for future audiences, embedding stories in granite, gesture and sound.

 

As part of the collection we re-embody our practice and performance of Vibrational Poetics. Sensorily embodying typographic forms, inflecting messages with typo/choreographic gestures of ligatures and Limbs.

 

This ongoing, collaborative work was originally conceived through a development residency with artist Aaron McPeake in the Morgue Gallery, Chelsea School of Art, London. The first iteration {~} ... , ... ; ... was performed at the opening weekend of The National, Sydney, 2019, and was one of several Essays in Vibrational Poetics that d’Evie presented as propositions to expand the perceptual space of publication. 

 

 

CREDITS

Adelaide International 
SAMSTAG Museum of Art 
Adelaide
26 Feb - 1 April 2021

Performance 19 & 20 March
Fayen d’Evie and Benjamin Hancock
{~} ...  ,  ...  ;  ... (2nd edition) 
2021

 

WRITING

 

 

"Fayen d’Evie’s Endnote: The Ethical Handling of Empty Spaces considers how we might write for a future audience. Recognising that the environmental and social urgencies of our world will echo forward, d’Evie engages in acts of speculative publishing, searching for accessible codes in which to safekeep our stories over time."

SAMSTAGE EVENT PAGE: ENDNOTE: THE ETHICAL HANDLING OF EMPTY SPACES / PERFORMANCE

 

"In the final turn of ‘2021 Adelaide//International’, Fayen d’Evie’s Endnote: The Ethical Handling of Empty Spaces (2021) left us with a proposition: how might we transmit our stories into the future? D’Evie’s reply is found in the material properties of language. Drawing on her experience of blindness, her speculative texts are driven by tacit, embodied knowledge – ‘essays’ scribed in marble, stone and wood, signs transcribed into printed typography. As dancer and choreographer Benjamin Hancock performed between D’Evie’s suppositional works, he iterated a single phrase through motion – an arm held, a body poised, a gesture echoing into the future."

Through lines: ‘2021 Adelaide//International’ at Samstag Museum of Art

Belinda Howden Art Monthly Australasia April 8 2021

 

CATALOGUE TEXT BY MAX DELANY

Experimental Blundering and Embodiment: Fayen d’Evie’s Intersensory Conversations

2021_adelaide_international_digital-catalogue_.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1/3
 

Fayen d'Evie: Essays In Vibrational Poetics {~~} ... , ... ; ... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

{~~} ... , ... ; ... is the second issue of a serial, performative essay experimenting with embodied typography and sensorial texts. This new issue offers a translation through vibrational poetics of a phrase carved in Linear A, the undeciphered ancient script of the Minoans.

This ongoing, collaborative work was originally conceived through a development residency with artist Aaron McPeake in the Morgue Gallery, Chelsea School of Art, London. The first iteration {~} ... , ... ; ... was performed at the opening weekend of The National, Sydney, 2019, and was one of several Essays in Vibrational Poetics that d’Evie presented as propositions to expand the perceptual space of publication.

 

Images: Film Stills

1/3

CREDITS

Language: Interdisciplinary Public Forum
The Ian Potter Museum of Art
Melbourne University Old Quad Library
19 October 2019

 
 

VIDEO

 

WRITING

 

"The forum also featured What might be obvious to me may not be obvious to others, a performance lecture by artist Sam Petersen and a newly commissioned performance of Fayen d’Evie and Benjamin Hancock’s Essays in vibrational poetics {~~} … , … ; … 2019."

Language: Interdisciplinary Public Forum Event Page: 

LIVE AUDIO DESCRIPTION

 

Live Description by Mel Deerson
00:00 / 22:09
 
 

Fayen d'Evie: Essays In Vibrational Poetics {~} ... , ... ; ... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"In Essays in Vibrational Poetics (2019) Fayen d’Evie questions how to ‘publish’ fragments of messages for future audiences to detect, recognising that in the event of the collapse of civilisation and ecological calamity, these audiences might not be human. As her sense of sight continues to diminish, d’Evie turns to gestural, tactile and vibrational forms of communication."

 

Catalogue text by Margaret Woodward 

1/6

CREDITS

The National

Art Gallery of NSW

Sydney

29 March - 21 July 2019
 

 
 

VIDEO

 

WRITING

 

In Essays in Vibrational Poetics (2019) Fayen d’Evie questions how to ‘publish’ fragments of messages for future audiences to detect, recognising that in the event of the collapse of civilisation and ecological calamity, these audiences might not be human. As her sense of sight continues to diminish, d’Evie turns to gestural, tactile and vibrational forms of communication.

Publishing is a visceral experience, involving the visual, tactile, aural and olfactory senses, hefted for centuries with the geologic weight of metal and wood. While technology has removed much of the physicality of printing, the language of publishing still carries the traces of this bodily connection. The anatomy of type is described using a human lexicon, with individual letterforms composed of ears, shoulders, arms, legs, feet and tails. The ‘body type’ of a published page is embraced by an armature of headers, footers and spines. Wood fibre is impregnated with carbon, punctuated by metal. D’Evie both expands and challenges traditional materials and modes of publishing. While her speculative posthuman typographies are strongly connected to the human origins of typography and printing, her work is also embedded with messages of another kind. In The National 2019 d’Evie publishes a set of experimental ‘essays’ as propositions for carrying story through stone, wherein messages may be carved, heard and felt as vibrations, or performed through gesture. Held within these lithic essays are fragments that assert the importance of women writers, publishers and painters, and of those whose experience of the world challenges dominant normative ideas of the sensing body.

In Essays in Vibrational Poetics four ‘publications’ in stone carry poetic fragments of messages left for future posthuman audiences. Each ‘essay’ can be understood as a means of testing out speculative forms of publishing and typography that go beyond the traditional thresholds of written language. D’Evie introduces the fleeting traces of dance, gesture, touch and vibration as ways of carrying these messages. In Essays in Vibrational Poetics. Acknowledging Margaret Woodward, Núria LÓpez, Mrs Eaves, and women who painted the caves in tactile poetics, d’Evie uses the experimental font Blind Words (2015) by Núria López, which combines Braille and Latin alphabets. In other essays, American Sign Language writing inspires gestural, poetic communications, while inscriptions in the font Mrs Eaves pay homage to women typographers. These experimental messages ‘published’ in stone offset the weightiness of geology with the transience of gesture. Mineral seams in rocks are reminiscent of the spines of books, or of dancers or the complex bodies of the more-than-human world.

In collaboration with dancer Benjamin Hancock and sound artist Bryan Phillips, d’Evie’s score is made public and type is again sensorily re-embodied through performances of vibrational poetics. Hancock ‘inhabits’ d’Evie’s speculative typographic forms, inflecting her messages with typo/choreographic gestures of ligatures and limbs. Phillips’ low frequency vibrational compositions are sensed via non-visible vocabularies, signals that may also be detected by non-human species of animals and plants. In Essays in Vibrational Poetics Fayen d’Evie inscribes a new embodied typography, where the latent gestural qualities of type are released via movement and dance. Through touch, listening, scoring, puncturing, engraving and movement, the body is reacquainted with the visceral origins of publishing. Here, a new form of languaging emerges, a kind of ‘glyphic choreography’, in which d’Evie’s publishing in stone activates other sensory readings, transcending the present. Fragments left for future sensing audiences to stumble upon.

 

Catalogue text by Margaret  Woodward

 

AUDIO DESCRIPTION

 

 

Fayen d'Evie: From Dust to Dust: Prologue 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fayen d’Evie invited a group of artists, sound artists, dancers and choreographers to explore the vibrational dynamics of the Castlemaine Gaol on May 19 2018. Benjamin Hancock embodied a new performative form of vibrational poetics, that he and Fayen d'Evie had developed through working with resonant bell brass sculptures of Aaron McPeake at Chelsea College of Arts - Morgue London. At the Castlemaine Gaol, Benjamin performed amidst a cloud of McPeake's skeletal bell sculptures, which had been installed down one of the radial arms of the Gaol.

The Old Castlemaine Gaol is one of a global network of prisons built with a radial, star-like architecture designed to control deviant citizens through surveillance, segregation, seclusion, and enforcement of silence.

1/8

CREDITS

 

Castlemaine Gaol

Panopticon atrium and radial arms

Dja Dja Wurrung country

19 May 2018

 

HISTORY

 

Chelsea College of Arts - Morgue

London

March 2018

Fayen d'Evie

London Artist: Aaron Mcpeake

1/10

 

"With Benjamin Hancock, I will be exploring vibrational performance and poetics with London artist Aaron McPeake, who casts resonant sculptures from bell brass.
The collaborative development with Hancock is connected with research into vibrational poetics with artist Jen Bervin, in connection with the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI)."
Fayen d’Evie